#Jennifer Smith, Author of young adult novels, shows off her hairy pussy

Jenny Smith shows off her red dress while lifting it up to show her black panties. Undressing, the dress and heels come off and her hairy pussy gets put on display. Doesn’t she have a sexy hairy body?
Soup, Statistics & Young Adult Novels
Jennifer E. Smith is the author of young adult novels, The Comeback Season and You Are Here. Her third novel, The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight published in the UK in January 2012 and has been translated into twenty seven languages.
Her middle grade novel, The Storm Makers, published in the US in 2012 and her new young adult novel, This Is What Happy Looks Like will be published in 2013. Jen is a senior editor at Random House US imprint Ballantine Books and her first book was bought when she was an assistant at literary agency, ICM.
I asked her a few probing questions and she has kindly responded (and is still speaking to me).

ST: So, Jen, you have worked at a literary agency, and now you are both an editor and author – which is the best position to be in and why?
JS: I think they’re all great in their own ways, and I’ve really enjoyed seeing the industry from a few different perspectives. It’s given me a nice 360-degree view of the whole process, which has been incredibly valuable. I loved learning how things are done at an agency, and I’m incredibly passionate about being an editor, especially because I’m lucky enough to work with so many wonderful authors. But I suppose being an author is probably my favorite, just because it’s always been such a dream of mine. I think they’re all great positions to be in, though. The very best books are a result of teamwork – probably more so than people outside of publishing even realize – and I’m very proud of the books I’ve helped to create in all three roles.

ST: How many times have you been asked the question, ‘Do you believe in love at first sight?’?
JS: Too many to count! I guess that’s what I get for calling my book what I did. I’m also frequently asked what the actual statistical probability of love at first sight is – so often, in fact, that I feel like I should probably just make something up at this point. (How does 24% sound? ST: Too low!)

ST: Is it true that as an impoverished student you lived on soup during while studying at St Andrews? If so, what kind of soup was it?
JS: It is indeed true, and the answer is vegetable soup. Which sounds really sad, but it was actually quite good, and besides…there were crackers too! I also wore mittens in my dorm room throughout the winter (and the summer, actually, because we’re talking about Scotland here). It was all very Dickensian…

ST: How useful do you think your Masters in Creative Writing was?
JS: There’s always a lot of debate about these programs, but I think the degree of usefulness really depends on the person. For me, I was looking for time and space to write…and very little else. I’d already had a job for three years at that point, and so I liked how unencumbered I was that year; there were literally three hours a week where I needed to be somewhere, and the rest of the time, I was left to wander around and write (and eat soup). There wasn’t a huge amount of instruction or supervision, which I really liked about the program, though it did mean you had to be fairly self-motivated. I know some US programs are more structured, and I’m sure there’s a right place for everyone – but St. Andrews was definitely perfect for me. I was looking for time to write, and I was looking to do it in a beautiful place. So I don’t think I could have found anywhere better.

ST: You’ve just appeared at the Edinburgh Book Festival – what was the best and worst moment?
JS: Yes, and I loved it! What a cool experience. It was such a great festival, and there are so many highlights, but my best and worst moments are probably the same. I gave a talk in front of 175 school kids, which is a really big audience for me. I get pretty nervous before these types of events, and with school groups, you’re never quite sure how things will go, but it ended up being a whole lot of fun. They asked great questions about the book and the writing process, and afterwards, it was fun to get to meet a lot of them as they came up to get their books signed. So that ended up being a real highlight too. (That, and seeing people like Gordon Brown, Ian McEwan, and Chris Cleave in the author’s yurt — I was definitely a bit starstruck!).

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Jennifer E Smith
Unleashing her inner 16-year-old, author Jennifer E Smith has published two young adult books in her native US, The Comeback Season and You Are Here. Her third novel, The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight will be published here in the UK by Headline next January.
Although Smith has now found her writing feet in the YA genre, she didn’t set out to write specifically for teens: “I didn’t start out with the YA market in mind, I fell into it by accident. If you try too hard to put a label on it that you are writing for teens, you can end up writing down to them.

“I think if you happen to write a book that happens to be about a 16-year-old, it shows. I just needed to be pointed in the right direction by my agent, and told that my voice and what I was writing was YA. Once I realised that, I never looked back. I really like writing for teens, there is no better audience out there. I think that when you read something that resonates at that age, it’s such a powerful thing. There is something really electric about that time of life, and books are lightning rods for all that emotion.”
Statistical Probability tells the story of Hadley and Oliver, an American girl and a British boy, who end up sitting next to each other on a flight from New York to London. First love ensues, and the book deals with other YA staples: insecurities, fraught parental relationships and issues of identity. A love story at heart, the characters came to Smith fully formed: “There were a few surprises that came to me along the way, but right from the start I knew the nuts and bolts of it, so it was fun to write. I have had experiences where I’ve had to grit my teeth and muscle my way through the story. But with this one, everything clicked . . . I almost felt like I was cheating.”

Not a full-time writer, Smith’s day job is as a senior editor at Random House US imprint Ballantine Books. Her first book was bought while she was still an assistant at talent and literary agency ICM. She says: “Being an editor has helped me become a better writer, but I mean that in terms of craft. In terms of keeping in mind the industry whilst I’m writing, it can be a little bit dangerous. You always need to write the story you are passionate about, not the one dictated by the market. I spend a lot of time in editorial and acquisitions meetings and have a good sense of what publishers are looking for, but if I sat down and tried to make a conscious effort to write that book I’d probably be tied up in knots. There would be too many voices in my head, and I think as a writer the best thing you can do is really turn down the volume.”

Like many YA authors, Smith is also a YA reader. Part of a New York-based children’s literature book club that is filled with adult publishing employees, she’s pleased that the genre has grown so rapidly: “The category as a whole is getting so much more attention, which is wonderful. Part of it is probably that there is so much great writing out there and teens are such voracious readers, but I also think that adults have been gravitating to YA more, which is a whole new demographic that was a little bit unexpected. It’s so much fun to see everyone re-
discovering the classics and all these great new books.”

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